Credit Card Debt

Credit card debt is an example of unsecured debt. It results when a customer of a credit card company does not pay the company for the money he or she has used. The results of not paying this debt on time are that the company will charge a late payment penalty and report the late payment to credit rating agencies. It is the interest on this debt that enables the credit card companies to make a profit.

Credit Card Debt

Credit card debt is an example of unsecured debt. It results when a customer of a credit card company does not pay the company for the money he or she has used. The results of not paying this debt on time are that the company will charge a late payment penalty and report the late payment to credit rating agencies. It is the interest on this debt that enables the credit card companies to make a profit.

Contents:
1 Statistics for Credit Card Debt
2 Bankruptcy Concerns over Credit Card Debt
3 Political Aspects of Credit Card Debt

Statistics for Credit Card Debt

There are no statistics here for credit card debt at the present time.

Bankruptcy Concerns over Credit Card Debt

Sometimes the late fees and high annual percentage rates (APRs) overcome credit card consumers who frequently do not pay off their credit card debt, and often the customer declares bankruptcy or uses the "Skip a Payment" option some companies, like Next Month Online, offer. If a customer files for bankruptcy, the credit card companies are required to forgive the debt.

Because forgiveness of credit card debt reduces likelihood of profit and continued survival, the companies are generally willing to offer another deal to the consumers in danger of bankruptcy. This deal consists of reduced APRs, removal of past late fees and penalty charges, and reaging the accounts so that the credit agencies see them as late accounts.

Political Aspects of Credit Card Debt

Some credit card companies made lobbying efforts at the federal level to change American bankruptcy law [1]. Recently it was reported that Americans are paying off credit card debt more frequently, and this was attributed in part to the bankruptcy legislation supported by the companies [2].

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